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The Mobile Side Of March Madness

The Mobile Side of March Madness

March Madness. It’s kind of an obsession.

Whether it’s your sport or not, whether your team made it to the top this year or not, you have to admit that you got at least a little into it. Because come on, it’s MARCH MADNESS.

We all know that even people who have never touched a basketball in their life (except for maybe that awkward middle school gym moment they’d rather forget about) were filling out brackets and talking smack about “their” team.

You know what else people were doing? Looking stuff up on their phones or tablets related to March Madness. How do we know? Besides the fact that we were doing it ourselves, we saw some interesting data from Google about 2016 March Madness mobile usage.

Google’s data shows that mobile searches for predictions and upsets increased more than 45% and 40% respectively over last year. People also searched heavily for scores (79% of all March Madness mobile searches) and standings (70%). No surprise there.

But get this: searches for sneakers ranked second highest at 78% and searches for uniforms (67%) actually edged out the number of mobile searches for upsets.

Besides searching, people did a lot of game-watching on their mobile devices. In the U.S., more than 3 million hours of March Madness videos were watched on YouTube during the first four rounds of the tournament.

Three. Million. Hours. There are 8,760 hours in a year. So cumulatively, the U.S. watched over 342 years worth of basketball in about two weeks. Don’t all you people have jobs?!?

And they (uh…we) didn’t stop there. Basketball fans also watched thousands of hours of related videos throughout the tournament. Google reports that compared to the average YouTube viewer, March Madness fans were 16 times more likely to watch videos related to sports news and 13 times more likely to watch videos related to sports coaching and training.

You can look at this two ways:

1. “Yeah, great. Thanks. I already know convenience is eroding game attendance and now you’re making me feel even worse about how mobile is taking over the world.” Ok, Sad Chad, feel sorry for yourself. It’s not going to help anything.

2. “Wow. There’s an opportunity here, I just need to figure out how to make it payoff for my program.” That’s right, Joe McSmartybrains. There is an opportunity here. Your program has the type of stuff people are searching for on mobile. 

You’ve got uniforms and shoes – and odds are, you’re going to have new ones in the future. You’ve got sports news. You’ve got coaches and trainers and a whole bunch of athletes. You’ve got inside scoops, moments of glory, memorable personalities, and more. You’ve got reasons to make people wish they were there at the game. Plus you’ve got fans, and everybody knows fans like watching other fans do crazy things on YouTube.

You don’t have to make it all the way to March Madness to capitalize on fan interest in your team. Tools like online video give you an opportunity to be where your fans are and engage with them, no matter what your record looks like or where you are in the season.

You can’t stop people from watching games on their mobile devices, so don’t even try. Instead, understand the types of content your fans are into and give it to them. Keep it exciting. Give people reasons to talk about your program and buy tickets to your games next season. Then build on the momentum and give them reasons to come back again and again.

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