skip to Main Content
Go Ahead, Judge Me…

Go ahead, judge me…

Your brand is the story. Your logo is the cover of the book. That’s how I would best describe the brand/logo relationship.

And unfortunately as often as we’re told not to judge a book by its cover, that’s exactly what we do because that’s all we can do. What else do we have to judge it on, and who wants to read the book if the cover isn’t enticing in some way?

We recently worked with the Amateur Softball Association/USA Softball on their logo rebrand. It was more than just a visual rebrand, they also decided to consolidate their name into USA Softball. They are the National Governing Body of Softball after all, so it made sense to make the name change on the heels of an Olympic year and with the buzz of softball being reinstated into the 2020 Olympic games (which was just finalized yesterday!).

Let’s take a look at the new USA Softball and I’ll also share some key points during the rebranding process.

 

Pre-Planning

Before it goes beyond your walls, there are things that need to be discussed internally by those closest to your brand. If you’re scrapping your current logo and starting over, a lot of questions need to be answered to ensure you stay on track and in line with your company’s core values. There’s no doubt your brand has gained equity over time (probably more than you realize), so you need to be willing to give some of this up to start fresh. Here are some questions and thoughts to consider:

• Rebrand or refresh?

Sometimes a total overhaul isn’t needed, but you should assess whether making changes to your current logo will suffice or if it’s time to start new. Consider how much brand equity you have, what your current mark represents to your customers and raving fans, and whether slight modifications to your existing logo can get you through the next 10 years.

• Why are we doing it?

If you can’t figure out why you’re wanting to refresh or rebrand, it’s probably not the right time. Your reasoning could be based on some event that has you moving a slightly different direction, or you’re wanting to use a rebrand as a jumpstart to offer something different or enter a new market. Or perhaps your current logo/brand is stale and you want to rejuvenate your fanbase and customers by creating something new and exciting. Whatever the reason, make sure you know why you’re doing it, because you will have to explain it at some point.

• Get buy-in early

Everyone doesn’t have to be on board for a rebrand, but your key stakeholders and decision makers should be. Not only do you need buy-in from them early, you also need to know how involved they want to be and get any input on the direction in the beginning stages. Nothing will frustrate you more than developing a new brand that doesn’t make it past the head guy’s office.

The Rebrand

Deciding to do a rebrand is tough, but actually getting to a logo that everyone can live with is the real challenge. Here are some points to consider during the logo creation stage:

• Tell your story

As I mentioned, your brand is the story. And although your logo won’t tell the full story of your brand, you should be able to easily explain how your logo is a good representation of your brand and your overall company culture. Remember, this is all people will judge you by until they get to know the full story.

• Get input early

It’s important to get any preconceived ideas out on the table before starting on those first sketches. Get examples from others about what they like and why they like it. Just keep in mind any ideas should be easily tied to your brand.

• KISS

Keep it simple, stupid. This is easier said than done, but the best logos are the simple ones. Don’t add things to the mix to accommodate everyone. Strip away what you can without removing the essence of your brand.

• Don’t stray too far

After you’ve nailed down the primary logo, you’ll likely want to create variations of this logo for other applications. Try not to stray too far with secondary and tertiary logo marks, and know when and how to effectively use them. You don’t want to cause confusion about your brand by releasing 18 versions of your new logo.

The Unveil

• Celebrate it!

Soft rollouts are for wimps. You just created a new logo, now show the world! You’ve got to take that logo by the horns and ride it where it takes you.

• Timing is everything

Choose your timing. Consider what’s going on in your industry and what events you have coming up within your own company that will naturally get more exposure. And if there’s nothing noteworthy going on around you, use your logo unveil to stir up some excitement.

• You won’t please everyone

There will inevitably be people that don’t like your logo. Know that going into a rebrand. You’ll hear more about the negatives than the positives, which is why it’s important that you’ve considered all the things mentioned previously. This is your creation and careful consideration was given at every step, so don’t take every uneducated and flippant comment to heart. If you can justify why you’re doing what you’re doing, you’ll eventually get buy-in from those that matter.

Back To Top